We Asked, You Answered: Exercise by the Numbers

Few healthcare practitioners would discredit the merits of exercise for either cardiovascular patients or themselves, but opinions vary widely on how patients should be counseled and not all providers practice what they preach.


By Yael L. Maxwell and Michael O’Riordan

This is Part 2 of a 3-part series looking at exercise from a provider’s perspective, both for their patients and for themselves. Read Part 1 here and Part 3 here.

Though few healthcare practitioners would discredit the merits of exercise for either cardiovascular patients or themselves, opinions vary widely on how patients should be specifically counseled and not all providers practice what they preach.

In August, TCTMD polled its readers through targeted emails and social media to find out what they think of exercise and the challenges they face, both with prescribing it and doing it themselves. On top of demographic information, the survey asked questions about methods used to prescribe physical activity, knowledge of exercise theory, and their own physical fitness. Of note, respondents were also queried about sedentary behavior and about their formal training—or lack thereof—in clinical exercise.

A total of 330 cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, nurses, fellows, and other healthcare workers replied. The anonymity of the survey garnered some candid responses (although we acknowledge our survey results likely suffer from responder bias, with those who prioritize exercise more being more likely to respond).

To view an infographic with our results, please click the image below. You can also download a PDF.
 

We Asked, You Answered: Exercise by the Numbers


We encourage you to share your comments on the infographic and our survey findings either on Twitter using the hashtag #HeartMoves or you can email ymaxwell@tctmd.com.

 

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